We Tested 12 Fish Spatulas to Find the Best for Flipping Fish, Burgers, and More

Our top pick is the Wusthof Gourmet Offset Slotted Spatula.

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fish spatulas on a marble countertop

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

Straight to the Point

The best fish spatula is from Wusthof; it combines sturdiness with nimbleness, making it easy to slide under fish, pancakes, and burgers. For budget picks, we liked options from Winco and Miu. Sur La Table has a great silicone-lined spat for those that frequently cook with nonstick or enameled cast iron, and Lamson makes our pick for a left-handed fish spatula.

I have a confession to make: before this review, I wasn’t a huge fan of fish spatulas, preferring my little OXO lasagna turner over the slotted, offset spats. But after testing them, I can truthfully say my opinion changed.

A fish spatula can be used for more than just flipping fish (though it should excel at its namesake task); it’s a versatile tool that can slide as easily under pancakes as it can hefty burgers. The slats in the blade allow any drippings, liquid, or grease to slip through, while the offset helps slide the blade over the edge of the pan and under whatever you want to turn. I’ve even started using fish spatulas to serve slabs of pie, since their angled blade edge and offset finagles nicely into pie pans

I tested 12 models to find a fish spatula that was nimble but sturdy, and that was also comfortable to hold and easy to wash. During testing, I set out to not only convince myself of a fish spatula’s merit, but to also find one that I would use on a daily basis.

The Winners, at a Glance

The Best Overall Fish Spatula: Wusthof Fish Spatula

Wusthof Fish Spatula

This spatula slid easily under everything I set it against, with a swift scoop and a deft flip and deposit. The handle was solid, grippy, and nicely smooth, unlike some other spatulas that had rough, wooden handles.

The Best Budget Fish Spatula: Winco Blade Fish Spatula

Winco Blade Fish Spatula

This $8 fish spatula had a sharp, angled edge that slid easily under fish, pancakes, and burgers. Our only qualm is that, being a budget option, the handle looks a bit rough where the metal inserts into it. However, it was fairly smooth and comfortable to hold overall.

Alternative Budget Pick: MIU Stainless Steel Fish Spatula

This was another great spatula with a smooth, grippy handle. It deftly slid under flaky fish and hefty burgers, and also flipped pancakes fairly easily. Its blade was slightly more offset, with a noticeable dent where it bends upward, which was good for some applications (like fish and burgers) but not so great for ultra-flat items like pancakes, which wobbled when lifted. 

The Best Silicone-Edged Fish Spatula: Sur La Table Silicone Edge Slotted Fish Spatula

I was skeptical of silicone-lined fish spatulas, but this sturdy option won me over. The silicone is versatile (you can use it with nonstick or enameled cast iron pans without fear of scratching) and it was still firm enough to get under and flip food. 

The Best Left-Handed Fish Spatula: Lamson Flexible Slotted Spatula 

While this spatula has a very straight edge—around 80 degrees—it was the only spatula in our lineup that had a left-handed option. It did a decent job of flipping fish, burgers, and pancakes, and while I disliked the rough wooden handle, Lamson does sell one with a synthetic handle. 

The Tests

flipping fish with the winco spatula

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

  • Fish Test: I used each fish spatula to cook, flip, and serve two salmon filets cooked in a cast iron skillet
  • Pancakes Test: I used each fish spatula to flip and serve two box mix pancakes cooked in a nonstick skillet.  
  • Flip Burgers Test (Winners-Only): I used our favorite spatulas to flip 4-ounce burgers in a cast iron skillet. 
  • Cleaning Tests: I hand-washed each fish spatula after every test, noting if it was easy or difficult to clean.  
  • Usability Tests: I examined how each spatula felt to hold and use, noting if they were unwieldy or nicely balanced, and if they had a nice grip. 

What We Learned 

Angled Edges Were Better Than Straighter Edges

more angled edges were better: a comparison of a straighter-edged fish spatula versus a more angled-edge fish spatula

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

Throughout testing, I found that spatulas with a more severe angle on the blade edge (like on the Wusthof, Winco, and Sur La Table, which had 72-, 74-, and 73-degree angles, respectively) were generally easier to slide under foodstuffs than ones with straighter edges, like the Lamson and Victorinox (which had 80- and 79-degree blade angles, respectively). The blades with more angled edges gently cupped the food when they first slid under it, whereas the straighter ones had to be lifted at an odd angle and slid under all at once. While the MIU had less of an angled edge, it also had a more extreme offset, which aided its maneuverability. 

Bigger Blades Weren’t Better

Hell's Kitchen spatula vs wusthof spatula

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

While in some cases having more surface area can be useful, I found the bigger-bladed spatulas, namely the Mercer Hell’s Handle Large Fish Spatula (which had a 9-inch blade) and the OXO Good Grips Fish Spatula (with an 8-inch blade), were just too darn big; they dwarfed not only the food I flipped, but also my small hands. So unless you’re a grill master flipping ginormous burgers on a daily basis, stick to spatulas with blades under seven inches. 

A Good Handle Made a Difference

a closeup of the rough wooden handles on the Lamson and Victorinox spatulas

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

While it might seem insignificant, a good handle is a deal breaker; if it’s uncomfortable to hold, you won’t want to bother using it. My favorite handles were smooth but grippy and had a bit of heft to them. My least favorite were the roughly hewn, wooden ones that almost felt itchy to hold. 

Sturdy Silicone is Best

closeup of misen silicone smushing onto marble countertop
The silicone on the Misen spatula was a bit softer than that of the Sur La Table, causing it to bend more when pressed.

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

While I was skeptical of silicone-edged fish spatulas, the offering from Sur La Table convinced me otherwise: Instead of ultra-flexible silicone that mashed into the pan, like on the Misen, the silicone lining on the Sur La Table was actually quite sturdy. I really noticed the difference when flipping salmon onto its side; the Misen struggled to lift it, since its silicone edge was so soft and flexible, but the Sur La Table was sturdy enough to turn it on its side with ease.

The Criteria: What to Look for in a Good Fish Spatula 

A seriously good fish spatula

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

A good fish spatula should be sturdy enough to lift and flip heavier items, like burgers, but also nimble enough to lift delicate fish filets. It should also have an angled blade edge (ideally 74 degrees or less) for easy maneuvering and a handle that is smooth and grippy. If it’s silicone-lined, make sure it’s sturdy.

The Best Overall Fish Spatula: Wusthof Fish Spatula

What we liked: With a smooth, comfortable handle and a 72-degree angled blade, this spatula felt like an extension of my hand. It easily swooped under fish and burgers alike, and deftly flipped flat pancakes. 

What we didn’t like: At $65, this is quite expensive for a fish spatula. There also isn’t a left-handed oriented version of this spatula, and the spatula is recommended to be hand-washed.

Price at time of publish: $65.

Key Specs 

  • Materials: Synthetic polypropylene, stainless steel
  • Edge angle: 72-degree angle
  • Blade length: 6.5 inches
  • Care: Hand washing recommended 
  • Left-handed option: No
wusthof spatula on marble

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

The Best Budget Fish Spatula: Winco Blade Fish Spatula

What we liked: At around $8 at the time of testing, this is a great affordable spatula (that also happens to be dishwasher-safe). I liked the blade’s angled edge, which slid easily under fish, burgers, and pancakes, and its smooth handle. 

What we didn’t like: The handle, while mostly smooth, was roughly hewn where the metal piece inserts into the spatula. Like our overall winner, there isn’t a different option for left-handed folks. 

Price at time of publish: $8.

Key Specs 

  • Materials: Stainless steel, wood
  • Edge angle: 74-degree angle 
  • Blade length: 6.5 inches
  • Care: Dishwasher safe
  • Left-handed option: No
winco on marble

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

Alternative Budget Pick: MIU Stainless Steel Fish Spatula

What we liked: This was a nimble little spatula that excelled at flipping fish; the more extreme offset scooped up the fragile filets nicely. It also held up to flipping hefty burgers, and was comfortable to hold. Plus, it’s dishwasher-safe, which is nice. 

What we didn’t like: The end of the blade wasn’t as angled as our other winners, making it a little more work to finagle it under very flat foods, like pancakes. As with our other top picks, this spatula does not come in a left-handed version. 

Price at time of publish: $25.

Key Specs 

  • Materials: Stainless steel, plastic
  • Edge angle: 79-degree angle 
  • Blade length: 6.5 inches
  • Care: Dishwasher safe
  • Left-handed option: No
Miu on marble

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

The Best Silicone-Lined Fish Spatula: Sur La Table Silicone Edge Slotted Fish spatula

Sur La Table Silicone Edge Slotted Fish spatula

What we liked: The silicone that lined the angled blade of this spatula was sturdy and, paired with an angled blade edge, made this spatula adept at lifting, flipping, and nudging food in the pan. 

What we didn’t like: The silicone was slightly difficult to clean, especially after it was used to flip and maneuver greasy foods, like burgers—the fat sort of clung to it. It’s also only available right-hand oriented.

Price at time of publish: $30.

Key Specs

  • Materials: Stainless steel, silicone
  • Edge angle: 73-degree angle
  • Blade length: 7 inches
  • Care: Dishwasher safe
  • Left-handed option: No
Sur La Table on marble

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

The Best Left-Handed Fish Spatula: Lamson Flexible Slotted Spatula 

Lamson Flexible Slotted Spatula (Fish Turner) for Lefties


What we liked: This is a sturdy fish spatula that comes in a left-handed orientation, one the few out there with this option. It did a decent job in all of our tests, though we do wish the blade was slightly more angled. 

What we didn’t like: The roughly hewn wooden handle was a bit uncomfortable to hold (though it is available for purchase with a smoother, Polyoxymethylene handle, which we’d recommend), and the straighter-edged blade made it a tad more difficult to slide under food. 

Price at time of publish: $38.

Key Specs

  • Materials: Stainless steel, wood or Polyoxymethylene
  • Edge angle: 80-degree angle
  • Blade length: 6.5 inches
  • Care: Dishwasher-safe
  • Left-handed option: Yes
Lamson on marble

Serious Eats / Grace Kelly

The Competition 

  • Victorinox Flexible Slotted Spatula: While this wasn’t a bad spatula per se, the handle was very rough—almost itchy to hold— and the blade had a straighter angle than most of our winners, at around 79 degrees. 
  • Mercer Hell’s Handle Large Fish Spatula: With a whopping 9-inch long blade, this massive spatula is great if you’re slinging fish, pancakes and burgers from a flat top at a diner. But for home cooks, it’s just too large to be practical. 
  • OXO Good Grips Fish Spatula: This was another large spatula with an 8-inch blade that made it unwieldy. The blade is also soldered on, which isn’t a very secure way to attach metal to metal (welding, where the metal melts and adheres, is more secure). And while there is a smaller version available, we still think the soldered blade and straighter edge are not ideal.
  • Misen Fish Spatula: While I liked the grippy, silicone-lined handle, the silicone on the blade’s edge was a little too soft to firmly and decisively slide under and flip foods. 
  • All-Clad T198 Stainless Steel Flexible Slotted Spatula: This was a terrible spatula with a super bendy metal blade that struggled to hold everything we set it against—even pancakes. It drooped, it sagged, and when I washed it, the bendy blade flung water everywhere. 
  • KitchenAid Classic Flex Spatula: The handle on this spatula felt cheap and bulky, but the blade, while narrow and rather straight, did a surprisingly good job flipping food. 
  • Sabatier Black Flex Angled Fish Spatula: While the blade on this spatula did a decent job sliding under food, the handle was a bit large and boxy.

FAQs

Are there any benefits to having a silicone-lined fish spatula?

A silicone-lined fish spatula can be used with nonstick and enameled cast iron cooking surfaces without fear of scratching. So if you cook with either of these surfaces quite a bit, a silicone-lined spatula is an ideal choice. Regular metal spatulas could scratch and damage the nonstick or enamel coating. 

What is a fish spatula good for?

As their name suggests, fish spatulas are great for flipping all manner of fish, but especially delicate filets like cod, haddock, and flounder. And because they have slots, they are also good for flipping burgers, since they allow grease to fall away when you lift up the burger. Fish spatulas can also be used to flip pancakes and roasted vegetables, and all manner of flipping and serving tasks. 

Why is it called a fish spatula?

Fish spatulas are excellent for flipping fish, which is how they got their name; their light, nimble, and bendy blades can slide under delicate fish fillets (or small whole fish) without breaking them apart.