Gingerbread Cookies Recipe

These easy, homemade gingerbread cookies come together fast because there's no need to chill the dough before rolling.

Gingerbread cookies in various shapes on a purple surface.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

Why It Works

  • Creaming aerates the dough, reducing spread in the oven.
  • Plain molasses has a bright and delicate flavor.
  • Orange zest amplifies the aroma of the spices without getting in the way.
  • Using ample flour prevents sticking and tearing of the dough.

Gingerbread cookies are one of my all-time favorites, not just around the holidays, but in general. They're crisp, flavorful, and none too sweet, while their wafer-thin serving style also minimizes their richness, stretching a stick of butter into 60 cookies or more.

Like biscotti, gingerbread cookies have an excellent shelf life, so they can be made in bulk at the start of the season and enjoyed all month long (or longer).

How to Make Gingerbread Dough

My recipe starts with a host of holiday spices: ginger, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, nutmeg, black pepper (just a crack or two!), orange zest, and salt. The coriander and ginger create some bright notes, the nutmeg brings out the butteriness of the dough, cinnamon adds a classic vibe, and the touch of black pepper brings out the ginger's heat. Finally, the orange zest works as an aromatic, helping to open up the spice blend and round off its edges.

Gingerbread spices in prep bowl on a table.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

The proportion of spices may seem like a lot, but given the yield, it works out to a rather modest dose per cookie.

Aside from the spices, it's a very simple dough at heart: light brown sugar, molasses, butter, and no eggs at all!

Here, it's important to use a mild molasses (often called baking molasses, light molasses, or Barbados molasses). This style comes from the first boiling of sugar cane, giving it a clean and bright flavor. Some darker styles will be fine, but avoid blackstrap molasses, which is too bitter and high in sodium for this recipe.

Along with the spices and leavening, the butter, sugar, and molasses are creamed together until fluffy and light. This process can be affected by the temperature of both the ingredients and equipment, so it's important to use visual and textural cues rather than a strict timeline to determine when it's ready.

The mixture should be substantially lighter, softer, and more voluminous than when it started (for more information, read up on our guide to the creaming method for cookies).

When the mixture is soft and light, add the flour all at once and continue until it disappears and begins to clump around the paddle. Although the dough will not be entirely cohesive, it will come together in a smooth ball with a bit of gentle kneading on an unfloured surface.

That said, under-creaming and/or chilly winter conditions may prevent the butter from warming as it should in the mixer, making the dough seem crumbly and dry. So don't rush the creaming process and, if needed, take steps to combat the effects of a cold environment (read up on our advice for working in a chilly winter kitchen).

After dividing the dough in half, wrapped it in plastic and refrigerate until needed, but with this recipe that's an optional step (although it can help with timing).

Tips for Rolling Out Dough

The dough itself will be ready to roll as soon as it's made; by dividing it in half, it will be much easier to handle, prevent sticking, and ensure an even thickness throughout.

A collage of rolling out gingerbread cookie dough and flipping the dough on a floured working surface.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

As with any rolled dough, use ample flour both above and below the dough to prevent sticking. After rolling it to about seven inches, I like to dust the dough with more flour and then give it a flip before continuing to roll.

This ensures the bottom is well coated with flour, and capable of sliding across the work surface rather than sticking along the way.

A collage of stages of rolling out gingerbread cookie dough to 1/8 inch thickness.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

The dough is cool, and relatively non-absorbent, so there's no reason to skimp on flour. It's the only thing preventing the dough from sticking, and the excess is easily brushed away in the end. Plus, the leftover flour needn't go to waste, just sift it and use it to roll the second round of dough.

Sifting the used flour to remove clumps.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

Gingerbread cookie dough can be rolled to any thickness, but I like my cookies thin and crisp, so I take the dough all the way down to an 1/8th of an inch since they'll puff up a bit as they bake.

Measuring gingerbread cookie dough thickness with a ruler. It reads 1/8 inch.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

For those who prefer soft and thick cookies, stop at 1/4th of an inch instead, but do bear in mind this will substantially reduce the recipe's yield. This dough also retains an impression very well, if you happen to have an embossed rolling pin or holiday cookie stamps.

However it's rolled, slide an offset spatula under the dough before cutting, to ensure it hasn't stuck to the work surface. We don't want to see any lost limbs when lifting up gingerbread men, reindeer, and snowflakes.

Cutting and Baking Gingerbread

This is an occasion where it will help to have an assortment of cutters, both large and small, to help get the highest yield from each sheet of dough. The more you can cut with each round, the less the dough will need to be re-worked, and the more tender the cookies will be.

Because the gingerbread cookie dough won't spread much in the oven, the cutouts can be nestled fairly close together on the baking sheet. I like to bake them until firm and dry to the touch, but not too dark overall. But bake-time is as much a matter of personal preference as it is technical consideration, as darker cookies will have a more bittersweet, spicy profile.

After the initial round of rolling, the dough scraps can be gathered, gently kneaded into a ball, and re-rolled to cut once more.

Gingerbread cookie dough scraps on a baking tray.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

Beyond that, I don't recommend a third round of rolling and cutting, since the resulting cookies can be quite tough. Instead, I prefer to bake off all the leftover scrap pieces, as they can be ground into crumbs to make the crust for a holiday-themed cheesecake (no-bake or otherwise).

Fresh from the oven, the cookies will be soft and fragile, but they will become crisp and sturdy as they cool. Not sturdy enough to build a house (for that, I prefer a heartier, construction-style gingerbread), but certainly sturdy enough for care packages and holiday gifting.

Gingerbread cookies don't need frosting, since they're crisp and rich and totally satisfying without it, but royal icing is a fun and traditional way to further personalize the cookies.

Decorating gingerbread cookies with royal icing.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

For those on the fence about royal icing, I've written a guide to four major upgrades that can substantially improve its flavor and texture. And for those who love it already, those tips and tricks may just bump it up a notch.

Keep the icing plain and simple, or consult our video tutorial on how to decorate Christmas cookies like a boss.

Finished frosted gingerbread cookies on a baking tray.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

With or without frosting, the gingerbread itself will be light and crisp, whether enjoyed on its own, as part of a holiday cookie assortment, or paired with a strong cup of coffee.

A gingerbread cookie half bitten.

Serious Eats / Vicky Wasik

6:37

How to Make Gingerbread Cookies

December 2018

Recipe Facts

4.7

(6)

Active: 30 mins
Total: 2 hrs
Serves: 60 cookies

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Ingredients

  • 4 ounces unsalted butter, creamy and soft, about 68°F (about 8 tablespoons; 115g)

  • 4 ounces light brown sugar (about 1/2 cup, gently packed; 115g)

  • 4 ounces plain, unsulfured baking molasses, such as Golden Barrel or Grandma's, not blackstrap (about 1/3 cup; 115g)

  • 1/2 ounce vanilla extract (about 1 tablespoon; 15g)

  • 1/2 teaspoon orange zest

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger

  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon

  • 3/4 teaspoon (3g) Diamond Crystal kosher salt; for table salt, use about half as much by volume or the same weight

  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

  • 1/8 teaspoon ground coriander

  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

  • A few cracks of medium-ground black pepper

  • 9 1/2 ounces low-protein all-purpose flour, such as Gold Medal, plus more for dusting (about 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons; 270g)

  • Royal icing to decorate, optional

Directions

  1. Combine butter, brown sugar, molasses, vanilla extract, orange zest, ginger, cinnamon, salt, baking soda, cloves, coriander, nutmeg, and black pepper in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on low speed to moisten, then increase to medium and beat until fluffy, soft, and light, about 5 minutes, pausing to scrape the bowl and beater about halfway through. In chilly winter months, this process may take longer (see our guide to winter baking for more info).

    Brown sugar, butter, and mild molasses in the mixing bowl of a stand mixer.
  2. Reduce mixing speed to low and add the flour all at once; continue mixing until well combined. Scrape the bowl and beater well with a flexible spatula, then knead against the sides of the bowl to form a smooth ball. Divide in half and flatten into discs. If comfortable working with a soft dough, use immediately; if not, wrap in plastic and refrigerate until cool and firm (timing will vary depending on personal preference). If refrigerated for longer than a few hours, let the dough stand at room temperature until softened to about 70°F (21°C) before use, then knead on a bare, unfloured surface until pliable and smooth.

    Adding flour to creamed butter and sugar.
    A collage of kneading the dough into a ball and dividing the dough in half.
  3. Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). On a flour-dusted surface, roll a portion of dough into a 7-inch square. Sprinkle with flour, flip to sprinkle the other side, and continue roll until 1/8 inch thick, repositioning as needed to ensure the dough does not stick. After rolling, brush away the excess flour and slide an offset spatula under the dough to loosen before stamping into shapes with assorted cutters. Arrange cut-outs on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet, leaving at least 1/4 inch between each. Gather scraps, knead, re-roll, and cut as before (any scraps leftover from this second stage can be baked off to grind as cookie crumbs). Repeat with the remaining portion of dough.

    A collage: brushing away the excess flour from the dough slab and cutting the cookies into various shapes.
  4. Bake the gingerbread until firm and dry to the touch, about 12 minutes, and cool to room temperature directly on the baking sheet. If you like, decorate as desired with royal icing, and dry completely before storage (this can take 12-24 hours depending on thickness of design, ambient humidity, and air flow).

    Gingerbread cookies on a tray before and after baking.
  5. With or without frosting, the gingerbread cookies will last up to 3 weeks at cool room temperature in an airtight container.

    Gingerbread cookies decorated with royal icing on a purple surface.

Special Equipment

Stand mixer, flexible spatula, offset spatula, pastry brush, rolling pin, embossed rolling pin (optional), rimmed baking sheet

Notes

For soft and chewy gingerbread, roll the dough to a thickness of just 1/4 inch, but otherwise bake as directed. This will reduce the yield substantially, warranting at least a double batch.

Make-Ahead and Storage

With or without frosting, the gingerbread cookies will last up to three weeks at cool room temperature in an airtight container.

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Nutrition Facts (per serving)
44 Calories
2g Fat
7g Carbs
0g Protein
Show Full Nutrition Label Hide Full Nutrition Label
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 60
Amount per serving
Calories 44
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2g 2%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Cholesterol 4mg 1%
Sodium 31mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 7g 2%
Dietary Fiber 0g 1%
Total Sugars 3g
Protein 0g
Vitamin C 0mg 0%
Calcium 7mg 1%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 37mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)